SOSMass

Save Our State of Massachusetts

The Superbowl and Unions

Indiana union bosses are threatening to unleash their fury at Sunday’s Super Bowl in Indianapolis.

The Giants are taking on the Patriots on Sunday. But there’s another battle going on outside the stadium and all over the country, a battle about power versus freedom.

Stunned that Indiana is now a Right to Work state, and seething with anger, Indiana union bosses are threatening to unleash their fury at Sunday’s Super Bowl in Indianapolis.

The Big Labor hierarchy and their allies are fuming that union bosses will no longer be able to force Indiana workers into dues-paying ranks after the Hoosier State enacted the nation’s 23rd Right to Work law on Wednesday.

“Why aren’t states scrambling to embrace right-to-work laws?” one economic analyst asked this week.  “Fear of Big Labor,” she answered.

Big Labor’s intimidation racket is on full display right now in Indiana.  “You can tell them we’ll take the Super Bowl and shove it,” one Teamster union boss threatened.  He later told a local TV station that union militants plan to parks trucks to prevent football fans from entering and leaving the stadium — a despicable threat that if carried out could pose a serious danger to public safety.

“This is a life-or-death struggle,” one forced-unionism sympathizer absurdly claimed — in opposition to a bill that simply ensures that no worker can be compelled to join or pay dues to a labor organization as a condition of employment.  That’s a principle supported by nearly 80 percent of Americans — including union members themselves.

Protest, of course, is a fundamental exercise of First Amendment rights to speech and association.   Tea Party activists and other concerned citizens have peacefully rallied to protest Obamacare and other Big Labor-backed expansions of government power.  But what union thugs are threatening isn’t just another protest.

If cooler heads prevail by Sunday, football fans attending the game and the tens of millions of Americans watching at home will surely be relieved.  But it’s deeply troubling — and telling — how quickly union tyrants and their allies will resort to threats and intimidation to protect Big Labor’s forced-dues power over American workers.

The Giants are taking on the Patriots on Sunday. But there’s another battle going on outside the stadium and all over the country, a battle about power versus freedom.  No matter who you’re rooting for in the game on Sunday, it’s clear that the union militants are on the wrong side.

Sincerely,

Mark Mix

P.S. The National Right to Work Committee relies on your voluntary contributions to fund its programs. Please chip in with a contribution of $10 or more today.

The National Right to Work Committee is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, single-purpose citizens’ organization dedicated to combating compulsory unionism through an aggressive program designed to mobilize public opposition to compulsory unionism and, at the same time, enlist public support for Right to Work legislation. The Committee’s mailing address is 8001 Braddock Road, Springfield, Virginia 22160. The Committee can be contacted toll-free at 1-800-325-7892. Its web address is http://nrtwc.org/Not produced or e-mailed at taxpayer expense.

To help the National Right to Work Committee grow, please

forward this to a friend.To view as a web page, please click this link:

view online.


Related articles

Advertisements

4 comments on “The Superbowl and Unions

  1. MH
    February 5, 2012

    Wish I could get back 27 years of union dues that I was forced to pay to a union that I didn’t want to join. If only Massachusetts was a right to work state !

  2. Pingback: The game doesn’t really matter. | SOSMass

  3. Bill
    February 6, 2012

    Without Unions you would be working on Sunday and there would be not Super Bowl Sunday. Who gave us all the day off.? Benovelent big business?

  4. Pingback: ALL FOR ONE & ONE FOR ONE « A SECOND CUP

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Information

This entry was posted on February 4, 2012 by in Massachusetts and tagged , , , , .

SOSMass Archives

%d bloggers like this: